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The Global Impact of Respiratory Disease

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The Global Impact of Respiratory Disease

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Tổ chức Y tế Thế giới (WHO) đã ra mắt Liên minh toàn cầu chống lại các bệnh hô hấp (GARD) vào năm 2006 với mục đích tập hợp kiến thức kết hợp của các tổ chức, tổ chức và cơ quan trong nước và quốc tế để cải thiện cuộc sống của hơn một tỷ người bị ảnh hưởng bởi bệnh mãn tính và các bệnh hô hấp cấp tính.

Báo cáo của Diễn đàn Hiệp hội Hô hấp Quốc tế (FIRS) nhấn mạnh những bệnh này, cũng đề cập mạnh mẽ đến mối liên hệ giữa các bệnh hô hấp và môi trường, nhấn mạnh tầm quan trọng của việc phòng ngừa - nên bắt đầu trước khi sinh. Khói thuốc lá, ô nhiễm không khí trong nhà do đốt nhiên liệu, ô nhiễm không khí từ giao thông và các ngành công nghiệp gần như là nguyên nhân chính dẫn tới các bệnh về hô hấp.

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The World Health Organization (WHO) launched the Global Alliance Against Respiratory Diseases (GARD) in 2006 with the aim to bring together the combined knowledge of national and international organisations, institutions and agencies to improve the lives of more than one billion people affected by chronic and acute respiratory diseases.

The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda was adopted by world leaders in 2015 at a historic UN Summit in New York and came into force on January 1, 2016. The very ambitious agenda is a plan of action to achieve 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets by the year 2030, which include the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development.

SDG goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages is one of the most important goals and needs to receive special attention by governments and all stakeholders. Improved health will bring people out of poverty and contribute substantially to sustainable development. A lot of progress has been made in increasing life expectancy and reducing the burden of many diseases such as polio, maternal mortality and the spread of HIV/AIDS. However, many challenges remain to be addressed if countries are to achieve SDG 3.

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, are the biggest killers today. One of the very ambitious goals is to reduce mortality from NCDs by 30% by the year 2030. The WHO Global Action Plan on NCDs has recognised the strong interaction between NCDs and infectious diseases, including tuberculosis in particular in low- and middle-income countries and is asking to explore opportunities to improve the detection and treatment of co-morbidities within health services.

This Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) report highlights these comorbidities but also addresses forcefully the link between respiratory diseases and the environment and emphasises the importance of prevention, which should start before birth. Tobacco smoke, indoor air pollution from burning fuels, air pollution from traffi c and industrial sources are highlighted as contributing to most respiratory conditions.

We are living in a world with so many competing public health priorities and chronic respiratory diseases have not received the attention they would really deserve. Better advocacy for lung health is badly needed to convince policy makers, governments, donors, nongovernmental organisations and civil society to scale up prevention and control programmes in all countries, in particular in low- and middle-income countries. FIRS is contributing with this excellent report to put lung health high on the global agenda.

I would like to congratulate FIRS for having prepared this very impressive comprehensive report on the global impact of tuberculosis, asthma, COPD, acute lower respiratory tract infections and lung cancer. It summarises in a very concise way the burden of disease and outlines the possibilities to improve prevention and treatment programmes and outlines the scope for control and elimination of these conditions.

The report will no doubt increase awareness about the major lung diseases globally and lead to accelerated action among all interested stakeholders.

Professor Nikolai Khaltaev

Chair of GARD


The World Health Organization (WHO) launched the Global Alliance Against Respiratory Diseases (GARD) in 2006 with the aim to bring together the combined knowledge of national and international organisations, institutions and agencies to improve the lives of more than one billion people affected by chronic and acute respiratory diseases.

The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda was adopted by world leaders in 2015 at a historic UN Summit in New York and came into force on January 1, 2016. The very ambitious agenda is a plan of action to achieve 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets by the year 2030, which include the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development.

SDG goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages is one of the most important goals and needs to receive special attention by governments and all stakeholders. Improved health will bring people out of poverty and contribute substantially to sustainable development. A lot of progress has been made in increasing life expectancy and reducing the burden of many diseases such as polio, maternal mortality and the spread of HIV/AIDS. However, many challenges remain to be addressed if countries are to achieve SDG 3.

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, are the biggest killers today. One of the very ambitious goals is to reduce mortality from NCDs by 30% by the year 2030. The WHO Global Action Plan on NCDs has recognised the strong interaction between NCDs and infectious diseases, including tuberculosis in particular in low- and middle-income countries and is asking to explore opportunities to improve the detection and treatment of co-morbidities within health services.

This Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) report highlights these comorbidities but also addresses forcefully the link between respiratory diseases and the environment and emphasises the importance of prevention, which should start before birth. Tobacco smoke, indoor air pollution from burning fuels, air pollution from traffi c and industrial sources are highlighted as contributing to most respiratory conditions.

We are living in a world with so many competing public health priorities and chronic respiratory diseases have not received the attention they would really deserve. Better advocacy for lung health is badly needed to convince policy makers, governments, donors, nongovernmental organisations and civil society to scale up prevention and control programmes in all countries, in particular in low- and middle-income countries. FIRS is contributing with this excellent report to put lung health high on the global agenda.

I would like to congratulate FIRS for having prepared this very impressive comprehensive report on the global impact of tuberculosis, asthma, COPD, acute lower respiratory tract infections and lung cancer. It summarises in a very concise way the burden of disease and outlines the possibilities to improve prevention and treatment programmes and outlines the scope for control and elimination of these conditions.

The report will no doubt increase awareness about the major lung diseases globally and lead to accelerated action among all interested stakeholders.

Professor Nikolai Khaltaev

Chair of GARD



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